The future of the Reich Lab’s studies and interpretations of Late Indo-European migrations

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Short report on advances in Genomics, and on the Reich Lab: Some interesting details: The Lab is impressive. I would never dream of having something like this at our university. I am really jealous of that working environment. They are currently working on population transformations in Italy; I hope we can have at last Italic … Continue reading The future of the Reich Lab’s studies and interpretations of Late Indo-European migrations

David Reich on social inequality and Yamna expansion with few Y-DNA subclades

Interesting article from David Reich that I had missed, at Nautilus, Social Inequality Leaves a Genetic Mark. It explores one of the main issues we are observing with ancient DNA, the greater reduction in Y-DNA lineages relative to mtDNA lineages, and its most likely explanation (which I discussed recently). Excerpts interesting for the Indo-European question … Continue reading David Reich on social inequality and Yamna expansion with few Y-DNA subclades

David Reich on the influence of ancient DNA on Archaeology and Linguistics

An interesting interview has appeared on The Atlantic, Ancient DNA Is Rewriting Human (and Neanderthal) History, on the occasion of the publication of David Reich’s book Who We Are and How We Got Here: Ancient DNA and the New Science of the Human Past. Some interesting excerpts (I have emphasized some of Reich’s words): On … Continue reading David Reich on the influence of ancient DNA on Archaeology and Linguistics

How to interpret past human mobility patterns

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New paper (behind paywall), Interpreting Past Human Mobility Patterns: A Model, by Reiter and Frei Eur J Archaeol (2019). Interesting excerpts (modified for clarity; emphasis mine): Present investigations of mobility can be divided into two main groups: 1) individual mobility, and 2) group mobility. Research approach (…) it is arguable that, ‘the reality of a … Continue reading How to interpret past human mobility patterns

A Song of Sheep and Horses, revised edition, now available as printed books

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As I said 6 months ago, 2019 is a tough year to write a blog, because this was going to be a complex regional election year and therefore a time of political promises, hence tenure offers too. Now the preliminary offers have been made, elections have passed, but the timing has slightly shifted toward 2020. … Continue reading A Song of Sheep and Horses, revised edition, now available as printed books

Yamna the likely source of modern horse domesticates; the closest lineage, from East Bell Beakers

Open access Tracking Five Millennia of Horse Management with Extensive Ancient Genome Time Series, by Fages et al. Cell (2019). Interesting excerpts (emphasis mine): The earliest archaeological evidence of horse milking, harnessing, and corralling is found in the ∼5,500-year-old Botai culture of Central Asian steppes (Gaunitz et al., 2018, Outram et al., 2009; see Kosintsev … Continue reading Yamna the likely source of modern horse domesticates; the closest lineage, from East Bell Beakers

Fulani from Cameroon show ancestry similar to Afroasiatic speakers from East Africa

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Open access African evolutionary history inferred from whole genome sequence data of 44 indigenous African populations, by Fan et al. Genome Biology (2019) 20:82. Interesting excerpts (emphasis mine): Introduction To extend our knowledge of patterns of genomic diversity in Africa, we generated high coverage (> 30×) genome sequencing data from 43 geographically diverse Africans originating from … Continue reading Fulani from Cameroon show ancestry similar to Afroasiatic speakers from East Africa

How the genocidal Yamnaya men loved to switch cultures

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After some really interesting fantasy full of arrows, it seems Kristiansen & friends are coming back to their most original idea from 2015, now in New Scientist’s recent clickbait Story of most murderous people of all time revealed in ancient DNA (2019): Teams led by David Reich at Harvard Medical School and Eske Willerslev at … Continue reading How the genocidal Yamnaya men loved to switch cultures